Fueling the opioid addiction

Narcan+is+kept+in+the+fridge+of+the+nurse%E2%80%99s+office+in+case+of+overdose.
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Fueling the opioid addiction

Narcan is kept in the fridge of the nurse’s office in case of overdose.

Narcan is kept in the fridge of the nurse’s office in case of overdose.

Alana Woolison

Narcan is kept in the fridge of the nurse’s office in case of overdose.

Alana Woolison

Alana Woolison

Narcan is kept in the fridge of the nurse’s office in case of overdose.

Alana Woolison, Photography Manager

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In the midst of an opioid crisis, an even stronger drug was approved by the FDA.

Dsuvia, a new opioid painkiller designed for pain relief of soldiers on the battlefield, is set to be administered in hospital settings. It was approved by the FDA on Nov. 2.

In a statement posted on the FDA website, Dsuvia is defined as a sublingual drug, meaning it is taken under the tongue. It is a sufentanil, which is a narcotic that can be used to treat pain.

Due to its ability to be administered in a way that does not require the utilization of an intravenous (IV) injection, the versatility of the opioid serves the perfect purpose on the battlefield for soldiers that need quick relief.

The FDA approved for the painkiller to be administered strictly in hospital settings. However, the approval of a drug 1,000 times stronger than morphine poses worrying scenarios.

In the aforementioned statement made by the FDA, Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D. said, “the question is whether or not America needs another powerful opioid while in the throes of a massive crisis addiction.”

In 2016, more than 46 people died every day due to overdosing on opioids prescribed by their doctors. One of the top three prescription drugs used by high school seniors in 2017 was opioids.

In a recent article published by USA Today, they quoted, “critics worry the opioid will fuel an already grim opioid epidemic.”

Pam Cinadr, school nurse, said, “when it comes to an opioid addiction, someone already has an addictive personality. It will usually start with a gateway drug.” Cinadr said some kids turn to the use of drugs to mask their pain, which in turn further fuels the addiction.

Cinadr went on to say she was surprised when she received Narcan, which reverses the effects of any painkiller. The Narcan is now secured in the her office. She stated, “I have Narcan so I can use it if I think there is a possibility of an opioid overdose. That’s scary.”

Deputy Chad Weipert, school sheriff, said, “we thought it would be best if we had Narcan just in case we need it.” Weipert said he hopes it will never have to be used.