Spartan Shield

Why I didn’t report

Christy Bishop, Staff Contributor

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






In response to the movements over the recent years concerning sexual assault, a new hashtag has been gathering momentum on social media. #WhyIDidntReport is focused on victims of sexual assault, which are statistically mostly female, and why they did not report the harassment or assault they experienced, specifically in the workplace.

This movement was sparked mainly by recent events surrounding Christine Blasey Ford’s allegations against Brett Kavanaugh, Supreme Court nominee. After news of the allegations arose, President Trump questioned, in a tweet, why Ford did not publically report the assault when it happened 36 years ago.

Many people were outraged on this approach of scrutinizing the victim instead of investigating the event. Women from all across the internet came to Ford’s side with this hashtag and further explained the reasons they did not come forward with their attacks of sexual misconduct. Two days after Trump’s response to the allegations, over 675,000 people had used the hashtag to share their fears and experiences. This number is still growing.

Many of the tweets being shared mentioned that people kept quiet about their assault because they were worried they would lose their jobs or come off as overdramatic. Many women also mentioned that they did not even realize it was rape until later on when they learned what consent actually meant.

An anonymous student at Pleasant Valley High School that has experienced sexual assault chimed in on the topic. When asked about why she did not report her harassment, the student said, “I did not feel like creating a scene or or making anyone else that we work with think I couldn’t handle something trivial like this. I didn’t feel like I had the ability to press the issue.”

Another PV student chimed in on how they felt after their harassment, this one claiming she felt extremely violated and objectified. She said, “It took me a long time to even feel comfortable in my own body, I felt like people were always staring at me. I felt embarrassed and ashamed.” This is obviously a serious issue in society that is finally being brought to attention despite the fear and stigma often associated with it. This new allegation gave way for a movement that has been realizing the bravery of victims who speak out despite coming off as dramatic, weak, or promiscuous. Hopefully this movement will continue to support and inspire victims.

2 Comments

2 Responses to “Why I didn’t report”

  1. Hannah cornic on October 4th, 2018 10:23 am

    No one should ever keep quiet for something that is harming them

  2. Hunter Snyder on October 4th, 2018 7:29 pm

    Why would anyone be scared to say something about this? This is a serous situation and always needs to be spoken about and announced.

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Why I didn’t report

    Opinion

    An open letter to Mr. Strusz, our future superintendent

  • Why I didn’t report

    PV News

    Passing the torch: PV selects new superintendent

  • Why I didn’t report

    Feature

    Peaceful Style Boutique

  • Why I didn’t report

    Student Life

    After ALICE:The changes in school safety at Pleasant Valley

  • Why I didn’t report

    Sports

    Football playoff possibility

  • Why I didn’t report

    Student Life

    Halloween costumes & DIYs for 2018

  • Why I didn’t report

    Student Life

    Homecoming in the Quad Cities: School by school

  • Why I didn’t report

    Beyond PV

    Instagram co-founders spontaneously resign

  • Why I didn’t report

    Sports

    Keep your head up

  • Why I didn’t report

    Arts & Entertainment

    Improv nights coming soon

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






The student news site of Pleasant Valley High School
Why I didn’t report