French students celebrate Mardi Gras

+Melissa+Lechtenberg%E2%80%99s+classroom+is+full+of+decorations+and+delicious+treats+for+the+celebration+of+Mardi+Gras%2C+on+March+5.+%0A
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French students celebrate Mardi Gras

 Melissa Lechtenberg’s classroom is full of decorations and delicious treats for the celebration of Mardi Gras, on March 5.

Melissa Lechtenberg’s classroom is full of decorations and delicious treats for the celebration of Mardi Gras, on March 5.

Photo taken by Trinity Malmen

Melissa Lechtenberg’s classroom is full of decorations and delicious treats for the celebration of Mardi Gras, on March 5.

Photo taken by Trinity Malmen

Photo taken by Trinity Malmen

Melissa Lechtenberg’s classroom is full of decorations and delicious treats for the celebration of Mardi Gras, on March 5.

Trinity Malmen, Staff Contributor

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Students at Pleasant Valley High School taking French classes all joined in the tradition of celebrating Mardi Gras every year on Mar. 5 by indulging in delicious foods and festivities.

This holiday is a huge part of France and its people. Senior Christy Bishop thinks celebrating Mardi Gras gives her more insight into the French culture. “Celebrating Mardi Gras teaches us about another culture and gives us a greater appreciation for others,” she said.

The holiday of Mardi Gras, which means “Fat Tuesday”, is a celebration of indulging in a feast of des mets gras [fat-filled foods] before the period of fasting called Lent. Lent begins on Ash Wednesday, the day after Mardi Gras, and commences on Easter. During the fasting period, participants must give up something for religious purposes.

Although France does not have an established religion due to the law declaring the Separation of the State and the Church, they still celebrate Catholic-religious holidays. For thousands of years, France was known as a Catholic country; this was until 1905, when the law regarding the Separation of Church and State was passed.

As Catholicism was an integral part of France’s history and traditions, the people today still partake in these holidays and traditions despite many of their religious beliefs. In France, Mardi Gras is celebrated by large parades and carnivals throughout the country with people dressed in costumes and masks. On Mar. 5, the streets are filled with delicious food, dancing, and masquerades.

Schools across France also participate in this celebration by throwing the children a mini parade in which the parents are able to watch their children parade around in their Mardi Gras costumes. The schools also serve the children delicious Mardi Gras treats. This aspect of France became incorporated into the French classrooms at PV.

Junior Lauren Buechel thinks that celebrating Mardi Gras teaches her about cultural differences and more about the holiday. “I think celebrating Mardi Gras is important because we are celebrating cultural differences and it’s helpful to experience some of those holidays. I learn more about the French culture by learning about the holiday and the different foods that are incorporated,” she said.

French students are able to experience this certain area of the French culture. The students bring in treats for everyone in the classroom to indulge in and then the students watch a French film to further learn about France and their culture.

Bishop believes that this celebration brings excitement for learning french. “Celebrating Mardi Gras in class has allowed me to enjoy class even more and be more enthusiastic about learning,” she said.

The celebration of Mardi Gras allows students taking French at PVHS to further understand France’s traditions and holidays.